Category Archives: Uncategorized

Episode 73 – How Many Threads Intersect and Impact the World of Sports and the History of a Country? Authors Ethan Scheiner and Jon Langmead



How many threads intersect and impact the world of sports and the history of a country? On this episode, Larry invites author Ethan Scheiner to the show to discuss hisnewest bookThe Freedom to Win: A Cold War Story of the Courageous Hockey Team That Fought the Soviets for the Soul of Its People—And Olympic Gold. Freedom to Win follows the story of the 1969 Czechoslovakian World Ice Hockey Championship team who used The Olympics to protest Soviet Russia’s oppression. Larry and Ethan discuss the brothers at the heart of this story, Jiří and Jaroslav Holík, whose father had trained them to become world class athletes to escape the increasing influence of the Communist party. They also talk about the larger political situation in Czechoslovakia at the time, including Alexander Dubcek’s relaxing of political censorship and the Soviet Union’s military response. Ethan also explains the significance of the replica hockey jersey he’s wearing, which is based on the jerseys the Czechoslovakian hockey team altered to protest the Soviet occupation.

After the break, Larry sits down with Jon Langmead, author of Ballyhoo!: The Rough housers, Con Artists, and Wild men Who Invented Professional Wrestling. Larry and John discuss the history of wrestling styles, the development of over-the-top choreography moves, the public’s changing perception of wrestling stars from athletes to entertainers and the physical impact of wrestling on the long-term health of famous wrestlers.


Episode 72 If Words are Threads in a Storyline, Where Do They Take Us – Author E.A. (Ed) Aymar, Bruce Borgos and Jeff Circle



If words are threads in a storyline, where do they take us? This week on The Artful Periscope, Larry conducts a double interview with E.A.(Ed) Aymar, author of When She Left, and Bruce Borgos, author of The Bitter Past. Together, the group discusses what they enjoy the most about storytelling – strong characters, interesting subplots, and settings as characters. Both Ed and Bruce discuss their love for delving into the secret lives of their characters, and the challenge writers face creating flawed characters that are still interesting to readers. Then the discussion turns towards their favorite authorial voices, including Nelson DeMille and Barack Obama.

After the break, Larry welcomes Jeff Circle, author of The Dossier, to the show. Larry and Jeff discuss Jeff’s career as a federal special investigator, police offer and an intelligence analyst for the United States military. As an interviewer, Larry asks Jeff about the art of interrogation and the unique relationship between the person asking the questions and the person answering them. Jeff discusses his experiences as a federal investigator and how it gave him the skills to become a successful interviewer, interviewing authors about their books and the writing process. Jeff also discusses his military experiences, how September 11th inspired him to take action, and his current love for the writing process and the craft of composing a novel.


Episode 71 – How Many Threads are Brought Together in Criminal Justice Reform – Colleen P. Eren



How many threads are brought together in criminal justice reform? On this week’s episode of The Artful Periscope,,Larry sits down with Colleen P. Eren, Associate Professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice at William Paterson University and author of Reform Nation which discusses the First Step Act– a surprising piece of legislation signed off by Donald Trump on the verge of a government shutdown and it’s effect on prison reform in The United States. Colleen traces her interest in reformation to her experience at her catholic high school, where she heard a talk from Sister Helen Prejean, author of Dead Man Walking. She became involved with the anti-death penalty movement while pursuing a degree in sociology at Hofstra University. Larry and Colleen discuss the history of mass incarceration and its boom during the Nixon Era, which increased the prison population from 250,000 to 1.2 million. Colleen explains the connection between mass incarceration and institutionalized racism, and the rise of mass incarceration after the end of The Jim Crow Laws.  She also addresses the increasing tension between police and the public following the BLM movement. In a country fiercely divided by right and left, Colleen advocates for cooperation across the aisle to support prison reform initiatives and program funding.


Episode 70 – How Many Threads Takes Us Behind the Scenes of the Basketball World – Rich Cohen & Michelle J. Manno




Episode 69 – How Many Threads Do Storytellers Weave Together? – Author S. J. Rozan



How many threads do storytellers weave together?  Joining Larry on the show is return guest S. J. Rozan to talk about her latest work Mayors of New York.  S. J. shares that she has a love affair with New York City and wants to share that love with the reader.  Larry asks if part of the book was influenced by Jeffrey Epstein and S. J. shares that she is interested in people of a lower social strata.  S. J. explains the concept of a character being the “subject or the object” of a narrative.  Larry shares his affection for one of S. J.’s character’s mothers and how he missed not having her in this most recent work. Then the conversation evolves into first generation immigrants and how a the place they settle in becomes a hub for their home culture, and the food seems to be the largest representation of their homelands.  There was also a great discussion of Martin Luther King as this episode was recorded the day after the holiday.


Episode 68 – How Are The Threads of Family History Interwoven into Storylines? – Author Stephen Hunter



How are the threads of family history interwoven into storylines?  In this episode, Larry checks off his bucket list by being joined by Pulitzer prize winning author, Stephen Hunter to talk about his new work Front Sight.  Larry and Stephen explore the origin of character names and “if you don’t get the name right, you don’t get the character right”. Larry also posits that when a grandfather passes away so does an entire library and Stephen shares what he learned from his grandfather.  In weaving and crafting a story, Stephen shares his thoughts on planning plotlines, especially since he feels like he just jumped out of a Super Sabre fighter with blue shade shoes on from the 50’s. Larry also questions whether or not our history is a prologue.


Episode 67 – How Many Threads Connect Us to Story Tellers Whether an Author or a Singer Songwriter? Author James Wolff and Singer Pete Mancini



How many threads connect us to story tellers whether an author or a singer/songwriter?  In this episode, Larry chats with James Wolff author of the book The Man in the Corduroy Suit.  Larry loves spy novels and asks how James picked his “pen name”. James shares what genre of book tickles his fancy and some of his favorite authors.  Larry speaks about the idea of a “public life”, “private life” and a “secret life” and asks James about each and how they help him develop his characters. In the world of intelligence, it is a “zero sum game” because in the end there isn’t much progress and James gives his thoughts. Larry asks if James knows what his characters sound like, whether accent or tone of voice. James, being a former intelligence agent, has to have his work vetted by his previous employer with a rather mysterious process. Larry asks how sharing intelligence between Britain and the US happens. Larry and James talk about Russia, Brexit and Ukraine and how things have changed from the “good old days”.

After the break, Larry is joined by return guest Pete Mancini.  Pete joins the podcast with the song Golden Hour.  Larry asks how Pete felt being in Georgia during the time of recent Supreme Court decision regarding election indictments.  Pete shares an update since being the band Butchers Blind and has put out 3 albums. Larry talks about how special music can be including being transported back in time.  Pete then plays The Law of the River and speaks about inspiration behind the song.  Larry asks exactly “what is American music” talking about all that has evolved from the American experience and Larry expands the question to talk about how Pete expands his roots to develop his art. Pete shares what he listens to so he can “tune out” and get lost in music.  Pete ends the podcast with his work Madison Avenue Blues.


Episode 66 – How Many Threads Lead Us To Cultural Dissonance – Author Alma Katsu



How many threads lead us to cultural dissonance?  In this installment of the podcast, Larry invites back to the program author Alma Katsu discussing her latest work The Fervor  Larry asks how difficult is it to put a character into a crisis and how they work their way out of that situation?  Alma discusses developing conflict in a story and always ask what the worst thing that can happen, then write their way out.  Larry talks about how Alma’s culture growing up with a Japanese mother and being a Roman Catholic affects her writing.  The book jumps from the 1927 to the 40’s and Larry posits why the basis of the story starts with a man and his family. Larry asks about the “spy balloons” from China and the balloons in Alma’s book and why are balloons so central to the story?  There is also a pensive talk about how the settings are also characters in the story.  In terms of memory there are 3 types, short term, long term and institutional memory.  Larry asks which memory is central to the book? Alma describes how this work is different than most of her other historical horror/fiction. After a break, Larry speaks about storytelling in terms of professional wrestling.  Larry watched the sport in the past and has recently began watching once again.  In storytelling there are heroes and villains, but in wrestling, there are heels and babyfaces, and Larry speaks about the Netflix series Wrestlers and how the characters personal lives follow their characters.


Episode 65 – How Many Threads Connect Authors and What We Can Learn – Nelson and Alex DeMille



How many threads connect authors and what we can learn.  On this episode are two amazing authors who really need no introduction.  Nelson DeMille and his son Alex DeMille join the program to talk about their latest work Blood Lines.  Larry asks what it is like to co-author a book with a fellow family member and also if it was a challenge to find the starting point for the story.  Nelson talks about his writing style which is a departure from most authors with a “write as you go” plan. There is also a lively discussion about how the development of the characters develops in the writing process. Nelson and Alex also discuss how they study both current events and do extensive research before formulating a story and Larry posits how losing colleagues in the field can effect writing.


Episode 64 In the World of Espionage, How Many Threads are Unwoven Author I. S. Berry



In the world of espionage, how many threads are unwoven?  In this installment of the podcast, Larry chats with author of the book The Peacock and the Sparrow, I. S. Berry.  Larry talks of origin stories and asks when a child, where did the door open up to have a thought to be a writer?  Ilana shares how she came to work as a spy with her beginnings in law.  Larry poses the idea of the importance of trees in storytelling and Ilana shares how the “spy business” is the only career that is made or broken (or even life threatening) by bonds with strangers.  Ilana also delves into the nature of manipulation and when you become a master at it, you sometimes cannot see when it is you who are manipulated.