Episode 66 – How Many Threads Lead Us To Cultural Dissonance – Author Alma Katsu



How many threads lead us to cultural dissonance?  In this installment of the podcast, Larry invites back to the program author Alma Katsu discussing her latest work The Fervor  Larry asks how difficult is it to put a character into a crisis and how they work their way out of that situation?  Alma discusses developing conflict in a story and always ask what the worst thing that can happen, then write their way out.  Larry talks about how Alma’s culture growing up with a Japanese mother and being a Roman Catholic affects her writing.  The book jumps from the 1927 to the 40’s and Larry posits why the basis of the story starts with a man and his family. Larry asks about the “spy balloons” from China and the balloons in Alma’s book and why are balloons so central to the story?  There is also a pensive talk about how the settings are also characters in the story.  In terms of memory there are 3 types, short term, long term and institutional memory.  Larry asks which memory is central to the book? Alma describes how this work is different than most of her other historical horror/fiction. After a break, Larry speaks about storytelling in terms of professional wrestling.  Larry watched the sport in the past and has recently began watching once again.  In storytelling there are heroes and villains, but in wrestling, there are heels and babyfaces, and Larry speaks about the Netflix series Wrestlers and how the characters personal lives follow their characters.


Episode 65 – How Many Threads Connect Authors and What We Can Learn – Nelson and Alex DeMille



How many threads connect authors and what we can learn.  On this episode are two amazing authors who really need no introduction.  Nelson DeMille and his son Alex DeMille join the program to talk about their latest work Blood Lines.  Larry asks what it is like to co-author a book with a fellow family member and also if it was a challenge to find the starting point for the story.  Nelson talks about his writing style which is a departure from most authors with a “write as you go” plan. There is also a lively discussion about how the development of the characters develops in the writing process. Nelson and Alex also discuss how they study both current events and do extensive research before formulating a story and Larry posits how losing colleagues in the field can effect writing.


Episode 64 In the World of Espionage, How Many Threads are Unwoven Author I. S. Berry



In the world of espionage, how many threads are unwoven?  In this installment of the podcast, Larry chats with author of the book The Peacock and the Sparrow, I. S. Berry.  Larry talks of origin stories and asks when a child, where did the door open up to have a thought to be a writer?  Ilana shares how she came to work as a spy with her beginnings in law.  Larry poses the idea of the importance of trees in storytelling and Ilana shares how the “spy business” is the only career that is made or broken (or even life threatening) by bonds with strangers.  Ilana also delves into the nature of manipulation and when you become a master at it, you sometimes cannot see when it is you who are manipulated.


Episode 63 – In the World of Espionage How Many Threads are Frayed



In a world of espionage, how many threads are frayed?  In this installment of the podcast, Larry speaks with Paul Vidich, author and 3 time guest on the show.  He has penned the new novel Beirut Station. Larry and Paul speak about the parallels between the current crisis in Israel with Hamas and how timely his book is. Then the conversation shifts to the size of Paul’s name on the cover, what he does once a work is complete and they even draw a comparison between the movie Empire of the Sun and Beirut Station. Larry also asks Paul what historical figure he would like to have dinner with; past of present.

After a short break, Larry discusses how marathoners and storytellers both have the same process of “Preparation, Research and Practice”

 


Episode 62 – In Relationships, How Many Threads are Unwoven? Joseph Ammendolea



In relationships, how many threads are unwoven? This this installment of The Artful Periscope, Larry sits down with Joseph Ammendolea, film director and owner of “I Like to Play with Toys” productions. Joseph recounts his childhood, his early filmmaking experiences at Hofstra University and how he finds actors for his projects. Then the discussion turns towards his latest film, Broken Hearted, which follows the love story between a struggling PHD student and woman who has just left a toxic relationship, as well as the relationships of the people around them. Joseph reveals the process behind the film’s creation, recounting the challenges of filming on location, finding indie music artists to craft the soundtrack, coaching and directing the film’s cast, and the challenges of film promotion. 


Episode 61 – How Many Threads Connect the Past to the Present – Nicci Gerard and Sean French



How many threads connect the past to the present? In this installment of the podcast, Larry sits down with wife and husband writing team Nicci Gerard & Sean French to discuss their latest book The Favor. Together they examine the ethical dilemma at the center of the novel- how far would you go to do a favor for someone who is important to you? Nicci and Sean also discuss living in rural England, famous mystery writer Agatha Christie and the creative process behind their writing.

After the break, Larry interviews Jules Howard about his book Wonderdog, which explores the science of dog psychology. Howard sheds light on historic (and sometimes unethical) attempts to study dogs, as well as modern perspectives on dog intelligence, cognition, and relationships.  At the end of the episode, Larry reminiscences about the wonderful dogs who changed his own life. 


Episode 60 – How Many Threads Connect the Relationships Between Mankind and the Horse? Author Fred M. Kray and Rory’s Island



How many threads connect the relationships between mankind and the horse? In this episode of The Artful Periscope, Larry sits down with author Fred M. Kray to discuss his latest book Broken: The Suspicious Death of Alydar and the End of Horse Racing’s Golden Age. Together they untangle the unsolved murder of Alydar, a famous racehorse who mysteriously broke his leg one night when locked up in his paddock. To help us understand this case, Fred discusses the culture of horse-racing, the money and politics that drive the industry and the questionable treatment of racehorses by their people who claim to love them the most. After the break, Rory Vescy hosts another episode of Rory’s Island during which she shares a piece written about Ctreeny, an organization in Sagaponack, NY which uses horses to support adults and children that have special needs. 


Episode 59 – How Many Threads Connect the Reader to the Crime Fiction Writers They Follow – Reed Farrel Coleman and Ben Crane



How many threads connect the reader to the crime fiction writers that they follow.

Larry was fortunate to have well known crime fiction writer Reed Farrel Coleman to talk about his latest work Sleepless City.  Larry asks Reed how he defines Noir fiction to which he responds “french for black” which brings a chuckle.  Some have called Reed the “crime fiction writers crime fiction writer” and the response is very telling.  Larry posits the question “how important is the cover of a new book to attract a new reader” and folds that question into how an author challenges himself with a character’s development.  The two also discuss Elmore Leonard and how the protagonist in a work is not always the enemy.

After the break, Larry is joined by author Ben Crane, author of the book Man of Lies.  Larry first poses that the feeling he got from the book is a combination of Ozark, The Sting, and Fargo, and the chill he felt when he read the line from the book “nothing I say is the truth, nothing I say is a lie”.  There is a discussion of how the character’s fascination at a young age with illusionists shapes his world, and how the setting of a story is also a character. Larry also explores what the true definition of an “anti hero” can be.


Episode 58 – How Many Threads Connect Us to What is Below the Surface Authors Peter Spiegelman and T. J. English



How many threads connect us to what is below the surface?  In this installment, Larry has a discussion with Peter Speigelman about his latest book A Secret About a Secret.  Larry and Peter explore the story out side of the cover of the book, how the title draws the reader, and whether this book is a cautionary tale.  Larry draws a comparison of Peter’s work with the television show Dark Shadows, and The Man in the High Castle.  Larry posits how important it is for the author to trust the read to understand the implications and be drawn into the plot and narrative.

After a short break Larry welcomes T. J. English about his latest work Dangerous Rhythms.  Larry asks about growing up in upper Manhattan, whether Jazz is a completely American art form, and how it reordered the music universe.  There is a great discussion of how BillieHoliday’s song Strange Fruit is a seminal work of art along with talking about Louis Armstrong, Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra and the connection of music to the mafia.  Larry brings up Meyer Lansky and how there was a “Jazz drain” to Europe.


Episode 57 – How Many Threads Contribute to a Cascading Series of Events? – Authors Paul Moses and Julia Boyd



How many threads contribute to a cascading series of events? On this week’s episode of The Artful Periscope, Larry sits down with author Paul Moses to discuss his latest book The Italian Squad. As a New York City historian, Paul sheds light on the forgotten work of Italian police officers of the NYPD who battled the Mafia while also striving to protect immigrant Italian families in a society that didn’t welcome them. Larry and Moses discuss his career as a journalist, the legendary police officer Giuseppe Petrosino and the friction between the police and the Italian community.

After the break, Larry invites author Julia Boyd to discuss her book A Village in the Third Reich, which shares the stories of ordinary folks living under the Nazi regime. Julia’s book draws disturbing parallels to modern times, providing a cautionary tale of how world events can push everyday people into extraordinary and terrifying circumstances.