Tag Archives: Peter Blauner

Episode 15 – What is the Thread that Connects Human Behavior to a Range of Pathologies – Abigail Esman, Tom Clavin and Commentary by Peter Blauner



What is the Thread that Connects Human Behavior to a Range of Pathologies.  Joining Larry on this episode is Authors Abigail Esman and Tom Clavin along with a commentary by Peter Blauner.

Abigail Esman is the author  of Rage: Narcissism, Patriarchy and the Culture of Terrorism.  Abigail kicks off the episode with a short passage from her book and then explains why she needed to pen this work. She has a lively conversation about how personal experiences & the experience of the events of 9/11 inspired her to write about pathological narcissism and its roots in shame-honor cultures—both familial and sociopolitical—through portraits of terrorists and batterers.

Abigail R. Esman - Pen & Sword

Guest and friend of the program Tom Clavin, New York Times Bestselling author, returns to the podcast to discuss his new book Tombstone: The Earp Brothers, Doc Holliday and the Vendetta Ride from Hell.  Always a fun guest, Larry talks about his love for the old west stemming from the movies of his childhood.  This passion for the old west and storytelling drove him to turn his book Dodge City, Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, and the Wickedest Town in the American West into the first in a Trilogy which also includes Wild Bill: The True Story of the American Frontiers First Gunfighter.

Peter Blauner, author, journalist and friend to the podcast joins with commentary on the year we lost writing giants Journalist Pete Hamill, his brother and writer in his own right John Hamill and Pulitzer Prize winning Journalist Jim Dwyer.  Peter reflects on how 2020 took these important journalists how they shaped and influenced him and the profound effect of their loss is because their brand of writing will never be seen again.

Peter Blauner


Episode 10 – How Many Threads Do You Need to Tell a Story – Librarian Bev Wowak & Peter Blauner on Pete Hamill



How many threads do you need to tell a story?  Librarian Bev Wowak from the Mattituck Laurel Library speaks with Larry about Kent State and the new and interesting book releases for September and October 2020.  Peter Blauner makes a return appearance reflecting on his time working with the great writer and journalist Pete Hamill.  Peter passed in August of 2020 and was a huge influence on Peter Blauner and Larry.

We apologize for the quality of the audio for this episode.  There was a series of technological issues that necessitated the audio to be of a lesser quality than our standard permits, but because of the important nature of this episode, we decided to publish it in spite of the audio quality.


Episode 9 – What Happens When One Thread in the American Tapestry is Mutated or Changed – Authors Peter Blauner and



Stop the world, I want to get off.

Yes Virginia, the emperor has no clothes.

Yes Virginia, facts are facts.

What happens when one thread in the American tapestry is mutated or changed?

Joining Larry on this episode, Peter Blauner, Novelist of such works as Sunrise Highway, Proving Ground,The Intruder, The Last Good Day, Man of the Hour, Slow Motion Riot, Casino Moon and Slipping into Darkness.  Peter was also a journalist for New York Magazine and a staff writer for Law and Order: SVU. He is also the recipient of the Edgar Award.  Peter describes what it is like to write for television versus novels versus being a journalist.  We also find out if he has ever met one of his characters after they have been developed for a book.

Also joining the episode is Novelist and Historian Kevin Baker.  Kevin has penned such works as America: The Story of Us, Paradise Alley, Dreamland, Striver’s Row, Becoming Mr. October, The Big Crowd, Sometimes You See it Coming, Luna Park and Dreamland.  Kevin talked about how during the turn of the 20th Century, there were 3 groups that were not wanted in America, Jews, African Americans and the Irish.  He describes those experiences as being similar to the movie Gangs of New York.  He also discusses experiences such as those who lived in Seneca Village, a predominantly African American area of Manhattan in the mid 1800’s which is now part of Central Park.